Special Operations Division (SOD)

criminal background check.jpgWhen the Government charges a defendant with a crime, the defendant has a right to a fair trial. What defines a fair trial is a rather extensive topic that is subject to rigorous debate. Discovery, which is the part of the trial where evidence is examined and exchanged between the government and defense attorney, is a key element to a fair trial. Most often discovery can result in a plea bargain or the case being dismissed altogether. In a criminal case, discovery mostly imposes duties to disclose information upon the Government. There is very little the defense has to tell the government; for example, the defense may be required to disclose the use of expert witnesses or the use of an insanity defense.

When the defense cannot fully access or discover evidence, serious due process problems arise. Currently, the government sometimes employs a trial method that completely disguises and conceals critical evidence in drug cases. Across the Country, a secretive U.S. DEA unit is using intercepted phone calls, wirtetaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records to help prosecutors and law enforcement allegedly catch drug dealers. This unit is called the Special Operations Division (SOD) and it operates in a thick cloak of secrecy. The heightened confidentiality that SOD information receives is creating problematic situations that undermine the rights that a criminal defendant has to a fair trial.

When the prosecutor or other government officials receive SOD documents, they are marked with “Law Enforcement Sensitive”. This categorization keeps the documents confidential and prevents the defense attorneys from knowing that they exist. In fact, sometimes the prosecutor does not even know that SOD documents were used in the trial that he or she is prosecuting. Law enforcement covers up SOD documents with a process called “Parallel Construction”, and the following example will demonstrate how this works: a police officer receives a SOD document detailing when and where a drug transaction will occur. It lists the people involved and describes how they look and what they will be driving. But, the document notes that the police officers cannot make any mention of the received information, so the officers are supposed to monitor the situation and create other reasons to stop the suspects.

At this point, the police officers will wait for the suspects to commit a traffic offense or do something else that warrants police attention. Usually, this results in a drug bust. When the police are generating the police report, they will omit the fact that they were using SOD documents and declare that the whole investigation started with a traffic stop or something akin to that. In many drug cases today, there is no way that the defense would know that a wiretap, informant, or other SOD related information is being used. Attorney James Felman, Vice chairman of the criminal justice section of the American Bar Association, states that the whole process is “outrageous… It strikes me as indefensible.” However, there is no sign that parallel construction will be going away anytime soon. There are many law enforcement officers and other government officials that defend and support the technique, going so far to even declare that it is a bedrock concept of criminal investigations.

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Gilbert Garcia has been Passionately Pursuing Justice for over 30 years and founded The Gilbert G. Garcia Law Firm in 2008. The Gilbert G. Garcia Law Firm is a boutique law firm, specializing in Criminal Defense. Gilbert represents adults and juveniles accused of a crime and who have with a felony, misdemeanor or record cleaning case. Conveniently located on the courthouse square to serve Montgomery and Walker Counties. Gilbert became Board Certified in Criminal Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in 1989. The Gilbert G. Garcia Law Firm is located at 220 N. Thompson St., Suite 202, Conroe, TX 77301.  www.ggglawfirm.com

Drug Related Charges may include: Possession of Marijuana, Possession of Controlled Substance, Possession of Dangerous Drug, Manufacturing a Dangerous Drug/Controlled Substance, Delivery or Intent to Deliver Marijuana/Dangerous Drug/Controlled Substance, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia and many other drug related charges.